News

Transport to Los Angeles

On or after May 2, 2019 we will be turning up a layer 2 transport circuit between our colocaiton facility in Reno and CoreSite LA1/LA2 in Los Angeles.

  • LA1 is the famous One Wilshire building
  • LA2 is 900 N. Alameda (CoreSite)

LA1 and LA2 are connected with high count fiber and are effectively a single virtual campus. We’re installing this for internal transit and peering purposes, but since there will be excess capacity on it we’ll be able to offer it up for transport service, too.

The current plan is to charge $325/mo for transport circuits. This will be an all inclusive month-to-month price for the local cross connect in the Reno MMR and the long haul transport. The underlying carrier will be AT&T. We’ll post an update once our equipment is online in LA.

UPDATE: We’re online and accepting transport orders to LA1/LA2 as of May 7, 2019.

Routing Policy Change for AS20115 Charter/Spectrum

With the activation of the Hurricane Electric POP in Reno, NV the time has finally come to turn down our transit connection to AS20115 Charter/Spectrum. We’ve given our required 30 day termination notice to Charter/Spectrum effective today, April 9, for a end of service date of May 10, 2019.

In the meantime, our routing policy for AS20115 will change to that of a local peering type connection for data collection purposes. We’re curious how much utilization we will see if we restrict it for its last month. Incoming announcements from AS20115 will be filtered with an as-path-access-list of “permit ^20115$” and outgoing announcements will be tagged with community 20115:666 (Do not advertise outside of Charter AS). We will also move the physical connection away from the border router where our policy is one provider per router – a role now assigned to Hurricane Electric on that router – and over to our core peering router. With these filters we only expect to see about 2700 IPv4 prefixes. Charter’s IPv6 BGP session is broken again, but it’s not worth the fight to fix it so this exercise will be IPv4 only.

While we would like to maintain a regional peering connection with Charter/Spectrum, our previous account reps were not able to understand our needs (and our customer’s needs) to successfully negotiate a renewal for interconnection and peering over simply “buying internet”, the latter of which is no longer interesting to us as a colocation datacenter operator.

UPDATE: Effective 4/10/2019, AS20115 has been moved to our core peering router where it will remain until it’s shut down for good.

UPDATE 2: As soon as our Any2 peering port is ready we will remove our connection to Charter/Spectrum. (5/7/2019)

UPDATE 3: Shut down BGP to AS20115. (5/8/2019)

UPDATE 4: Our port to AS20115 Charter/Spectrum is now unplugged and cross connects removed: disconnect complete. (5/8/2019)

Checking DNSSEC Domains

Recently we’ve started to receive support requests about DNS problems that turn out to be broken DNSSEC. Unfortunately we can’t fix DNSSEC problems on external domains, but you can run the following tests:

These tools will also show if a domain does not have DNSSEC. Running DNSSEC checks is particularly handy when using another tool that is not DNSSEC aware. Test tools that are not DNSSEC aware may return false positives when validation is broken.

Recent GDPR Stuff

Since everyone and their dog have been posting GPDR updates, we should probably say something about it too.

In a nutshell, Roller Network has never collected or used customer’s personal information. We do not require any personal information to set up an account beyond an email address, and we have never monetized any information. We’ve never had any advertising hooks in our systems whatsoever. We do not have any third party affiliates and we do not engage in data sharing. Information required in the account control center to use a specific service is limited to the scope of that service, and anyone can readily add or delete information as they see fit using it. Realistically, we’re a small company and don’t care about “big data” analytics.

On our colocation side of things, because we don’t offer “cloud” hosting services, our systems do not contain customer data. That’s one major benefit of colocation over cloud: your data and your hardware is yours, it’s not subject to the whim of a larger companies’ policies which – and be honest – can’t to be in your favor because they need to track and monetize your usage very closely.

We also don’t have a default contact preference when signing up for an account: an account can’t be created without choosing one of the three contact options. This means we can be 100% sure that everyone’s contact preference was made intentionally. There’s no check or uncheck the box with confusing wording kind of trickery here that other companies engage in so they can sell your email address with third parties.

Ironically we do occasionally get complaints about having pay for services or why our free accounts are slowly going away. This is why: because we don’t have any other money incoming except customers paying for services. For anyone who does want their personal data shared and monetized to get “free” services, Roller Network is not the place for you, and we’re not planning on changing that.

What we have done is enabled some cookie warnings since it’s harmless, and annoying at worst. We’re also no longer using Google Analytics on our main website and removed the Facebook integration from the Newspipe. We will continue to use Twitter since it is actually useful.

Hurricane Electric POP (2018 Update)

We’ve been talking about the Hurricane Electric POP for a long time now… too long really, but often some of the most difficult things to achieve are the most rewarding.

In summary, a lot of time was spent trying to make Zayo work because at the time, only Zayo could provide an east facing wavelength (cost effectively anyway) to give the HE POP east-west diversity. While the status quo locally has been to backhaul things out of California, doing so increases exposure to the risk of California earthquakes impacting connectivity in an undesirable way. For disaster planning an east facing path is extremely desirable.

The good news is that during all of the time spent working on Zayo, a second option, Verizon, actually improved and is now able to offer an east facing path option to Denver instead of the originally planned Salt Lake City. This is what’s in process now: Zayo is out and Verizon is in. Salt Lake City is out and Denver is in. It’s still going to take a bit more time for Verizon to do the thing they do for long haul, but statistically speaking the number of successful Verizon orders at our facility is significantly higher than successful Zayo orders, so we have a higher confidence level that this is the light at the end of the tunnel.

Hurricane Electric will bring 1Gbps and 10Gbps access ports and PTP transport to their other POPs at prices never seen before in Reno, plus peering at TahoeIX with their famously open peering policy that has made Hurricane Electric one of the top peered networks in the world.¬†Roller Network will be the first neutral colocation facility in Reno a to have a carrier POP* – a real one with peering – not “backhauled bandwidth” or transport to a “city with a router” (for example, all AT&T here goes through a router in Sacramento).¬†We here at Roller Network are excited to be the catalyst for this step away from the status quo.

*Yes, we know there are other bigger fish nearby, but Rollernet is actually in Reno, NV in Washoe County. The others are not, so when we say “Reno” we truly mean within Reno city limits, not somewhere nearby that will never be in Reno. We’re technically correct, the best kind of correct.